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Harvard University must release admissions data | Fusion

By Caroline Linton
Harvard University will have to release six years’ worth of admission data due to a lawsuit filed by a group with ties to anti-affirmative action organizations that alleges the university’s admission system hurts Asian American applicants.

The Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) filed a lawsuit against Harvard in 2014, alleging that the university has a quota system that has negatively affected Asian Americans’ admission to the school, according to the Harvard Crimson. The case has been stagnant while the Supreme Court mulled Fisher vs. The University of Texas at Austin. In July, the Supreme Court upheld UT-Austin’s race-based admission program, but wrote in its opinion that “considerable deference is owed to a university in defining those intangible characteristics, like student body diversity, that are central to its identity and educational mission.”

At Harvard, U.S. District Judge Allison D. Burroughs ruled Harvard must provide “data from the admissions database” from 2009-2014, as well as limited information from 2007-2009, according to the Crimson. The school is also ordered to release all previous investigations into alleged discrimination.

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This university student is taking cost cutting to the extreme - The Globe and Mail

ROB CARRICK The Globe and Mail Published Monday, Sep. 05, 2016 4:42PM EDT Last updated Monday, Sep. 05, 2016 9:18PM EDT 6

Jahnome McEwan plans to go through the entirety of 2017 without spending on anything but necessities and a dinner out now and then with his girlfriend. Spending on everything else – clothes, electronics, socializing with friends – is out.

“We’ve been trying to figure out ways we can save our money,” the York University student said in an interview. “We decided, let’s just do a complete paradigm shift and not spend at malls at all. Don’t buy clothing, don’t buy anything for a full year. See how much we can save, see how much we can invest. Do the complete opposite of what’s going on.”

Right now, what’s going on is a back-to-school season that ranks second only to winter holiday shopping in terms of how much we spend. Inflation’s up 1.3 per cent on a year-over-year basis, yet a recent poll of 1,506 parents suggested spending on school supplies, clothes and such will on average rise 43 per cent over last year. The poll, commissioned by coupon website RetailMeNot.ca, pegged average spending at $472 per child.

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Why Your Child's College Major May Not Be Worth It

Kelley Long, Contributor

Do you have a child approaching or in college? As more than 20 million college students head back to school this year, many will be making what is arguably the most important financial decision of their entire career before they even start: declaring their major. Granted, only about 20% of graduates take home the degree that they started on, but the sooner students gain clarity on this direction, the easier it will be to graduate in the standard 4 years and hopefully with minimal student loans. While 85% of people surveyed by Credit Karma feel like their education was a good investment, 70% are losing sleep over their student loans, which begs the question: is that education really worth it?

Holding a college degree or vocational/technical certificate is pretty much necessary these days in order to achieve other common American milestones such as buying a home, retiring comfortably at the age desired and living a life of low financial stress. Much is made of people like Steve Jobs and Richard Branson who made billions without college degrees, but part of the reason these are noteworthy stories is because they are the exception. At the end of the day, the major your child pursues is a key factor in whether or not college is worth it or at least whether taking out student loans is worth it.

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SAT subject tests lose favor for colleges - The Boston Globe

By Laura Krantz GLOBE STAFFAUGUST 22, 2016
Several top New England colleges have joined a growing number of schools nationally that no longer require applicants to submit scores from SAT subject tests, saying the specialized exams lend little insight into students’ readiness and can work against low-income and minority students.

In the past year, Amherst College, Dartmouth College, and Williams College all have dropped the subject test requirement, taking a lead from Columbia University, which announced the new policy this spring. Duke University and Vassar College also no longer require the tests, often called SAT II.

The shift occurs amid a larger discussion in higher education about the value of standardized testing in admissions. Some colleges, especially less-selective private schools but also such public colleges as UMass Lowell and Salem State, have made the main SAT and ACT tests optional.

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The College Drop-Off: Why It Sucks And 5 Ways To Survive

Laura A Boggs freelance writer, novelist and regular blogger at lauraboggs.org
You’ve finished arranging the toss pillows in your freshman’s dorm room, so you tell her one last time to eat her vegetables and not to wear white after Labor Day before you issue a lipstick-y kiss goodbye. Then you curl up in the backseat while your spouse drives in silence and you ache. What to do after that day, after you’ve arrived back home?

What’s to follow wandering empty rooms, sobbing and wailing like a toddler: “I want (insert your child’s name here)!”?

Not that I’ve done that.

Dumping (because that’s what it feels like) your kid for their first year at college is, I’m here to report, as heartbreaking as you imagined. One normally stoic mom I know cried for 24 hours straight; another lost it in the grocery store when she realized she didn’t need to buy her daughter’s favorite foods.

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Free College? The U.S. Should Look at State Models That Are Already Working - The Chronicle of Higher Education

By Nancy L. Zimpher AUGUST 16, 2016

Michael Morgenstern for The Chronicle Hillary Clinton’s stance on public higher education — that every American student should be able to graduate from college debt free and, in millions of cases, tuition free — marks the first time that such a bold, expansive proposal has been put forth by a major party’s presidential nominee.

This proposition could not come at a more crucial time. As Clinton proposes, and as President Obama and Sen. Bernie Sanders have said, we must expand college access like never before and solve the problem of staggering student-loan debt once and for all.

And we can — but the reality is that college can never actually be free. Someone has to pay for our institutions to operate, to educate, to innovate, and to grow.

However, public colleges and universities could make attendance tuition free for students from low- and middle-income families, or roughly 80 percent of the population, if the federal government were to make the necessary investment in higher education that a policy of this magnitude would require. This remains a big "if," at least for the time being, but the fact that the conversation is so prevalent today represents a real opportunity.

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Don’t trust your friends’ advice on getting into college — and other tips from admissions experts - The Washington Post

By Valerie Strauss August 11 at 2:50 PM 
It’s that time of year again when high school seniors have to seriously turn their attention to applying to college — at least those who intend to go to college and who haven’t already started obsessing on the process. Every year college admissions counselors try to help kids put their best foot forward to colleges and universities — even when students don’t listen and think they know better. Here, in the spirit of being helpful, is some advice from the experts, college admissions counselors who have learned these tips the hard way. The advice was compiled by Brennan Barnard...

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Admissions Directors Outline the Pitfalls of Hillary Clinton’s Free-Tuition Plan - The Atlantic

Bernie Sanders’s idea has made its way into Hillary Clinton’s education plan, but private schools are pushing back.

Shannon Stapleton / Reuters

 

 AUG 3, 2016 EDUCATION Bernie Sanders may be out as a presidential contender, but his proposal to make public college free has worked its way into Hillary Clinton’s education plan. While the plan is making some private colleges nervous, his campaign has succeeded in furthering a broader conversation among university admissions directors about how to make access to higher education more equitable.

Understanding the opportunity and achievement gaps in U.S. universities Read more

The applicant pools at selective universities don’t typically reflect the broader population, acknowledged Jim Rawlins, the director of admissions and assistant vice president of enrollment management at the University of Oregon, during a recent roundtable discussion with a handful of other admissions leaders in Washington, D.C. The different schools in attendance—both public and private, small and large—agreed that needs to change.

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The Truth about Higher Education and Student Loans

Jason Furman - Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers 
Over the past twenty years, student debt has risen rapidly and now totals $1.3 trillion, the second largest category of consumer debt. With the rise in student debt, and the deep recession, defaults and delinquencies had also increased sharply, though over the past couple of years, they have stabilized and started to fall modestly. That’s why for the last seven years, President Obama has worked hard to make college more affordable and student debt more manageable. Investments in education typically have high returns, and it’s essential to address the challenges of student debt, so that all Americans can gain the economic benefits of higher education, while minimizing the risks like failing to complete a degree, receiving a low-quality education, and finding a job with low earnings. A new report by the Council of Economic Advisers brings new data to bear to better understand the nature of these challenges.
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Closing the inequality gap in college savings - CBS News

By JOHN WASIK MONEYWATCH July 18, 2016, 5:00 AM 
When Bernie Sanders recently agreed to endorse Hillary Clinton for president, a question popped into my mind: Would Clinton be directly linking college debt to income inequality?

She has embraced a Sanders-inspired plan to cover the cost of college tuition at four-year state schools for families making under $125,000 a year. Although the plan won't cover room and board and doesn't address the underlying high cost of college or poor graduation rates, it's a step in the right direction.

Yet the country need a national dialogue on how to guarantee a debt-free degree. No plan on the table -- whether it's from Clinton or Donald Trump -- completely addresses that objective. And no plan tackles the college savings gap facing the majority of American families.

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Poll finds surprising American opinions on affirmative action | Washington Examiner

By JASON RUSSELL • 7/12/16 7:14 PM 
Almost two-thirds of Americans disagree with the June Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action that allows public colleges to use race as as factor in their admissions decisions.

According to a Gallup poll conducted over June 29 through July 2, 70 percent of Americans say merit should be the only factor in college admissions. That number has stayed relatively stable over the last 12 years.

Even 50 percent of blacks want college admissions decided solely on merit, without consideration for race. That same number is 61 percent for Hispanics and 76 percent for whites. Nearly two-thirds of whites, blacks and Hispanics each disapproved of the Supreme Court decision.

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12 Habits Of Genuine People

Dr. Travis Bradberry Author of #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and president of TalentSmart, world’s leading provider of emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence (EQ) is critical to your performance at work. TalentSmart has tested the EQ of more than a million people and found that it explains 58% of success in all types of jobs. Suffice it to say, emotional intelligence is a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with tremendous results.

But there’s a catch. Emotional intelligence won’t do a thing for you if you aren’t genuine.

A recent study from the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington found that people don’t accept demonstrations of emotional intelligence at face value. They’re too skeptical for that. They don’t just want to see signs of emotional intelligence. They want to know that it’s genuine—that your emotions are authentic.

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Most Americans Oppose Affirmative Action in College Admissions

By Heat Street Staff | 9:03 am, July 10, 2016 A new poll from the Gallup organization, taken in the wake of last month’s Supreme Court ruling effectively upholding the use of race-based criteria in the college admissions process, found that a majority of Americans — including minorities — are opposed to the practice.

Seven out of 10 people polled by Gallup said merit, in the form of high school grades or test scores, should be the sole basis for admission to a University. More African-American respondents said they supported racially blind merit-based admissions (50%) than those who said race should be considered an important factor (44%).

The poll was commissioned following the Supreme Court’s June 23 decision in the Fisher v. University of Texas case that upheld the school’s use of race to determine who gets into college in the interest of promoting diversity. The plaintiff, a white female named Abigail Fisher, sued the school after she was denied a spot because of her race. She said the school’s policy violated the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment.

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Public Colleges Chase Out-of-State Students, and Tuition - The New York Times

By STEPHANIE SAULJULY 7, 2016 
The University of California, Los Angeles, campus. The university system gave favorable admissions treatment to thousands of higher-paying out-of-state and foreign students, a state audit found. Credit Brad Torchia for The New York Times SACRAMENTO — Over three generations, the Michael family forged a deep bond with the University of California, dating back nearly 50 years to when Jay Dee Michael Sr. was the university system’s vice president and chief lobbyist.

Family members proudly displayed degrees from the campuses in Los Angeles, Davis, Berkeley and Santa Barbara. And when Mr. Michael died last year, his family asked that memorial donations go to a U.C. Davis institute. Recently, though, the relationship has soured, a victim of the economic forces buffeting public universities.

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Most families don't plan for college debt, study finds - CSMonitor.com

By Teddy NykielNerdWallet JUNE 30, 2016

Only two in five families, or 39%, had a plan for how to afford all two or four years of college, according to a new Sallie Mae report,“How America Pays for College 2016.” Students whose families had a plan borrowed one-third less in student loans than students whose families didn’t. The percentage of families that plan ahead has stayed relatively stable since Sallie Mae started tracking it in 2010.

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Neuroscience of bullying: Why do some find it rewarding? - Medical News Today

Written by Tim Newman Published: Saturday 2 July 2016 
 A modern, progressive society has no place for bullying, yet it continues. Breaking research uncovers why some people might find unwarranted aggression so rewarding.

New research shows how bullying activates reward circuits. Aggressive behavior is often a facet of psychiatric disorders. But it also readily occurs in people with no such condition.

Bullying has the potential to significantly reduce the victim's quality of life. As such, it is a topic well worthy of study.

According to the American Society for the Positive Care of Children, 28 percent of students aged 12-18 report being bullied at school.

There has been a great deal of study into the psychological and social reasons behind bullying. As neuroscience grows in strength, new findings are also adding to our knowledge about how and why bullying takes place.

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College grads are getting nearly all the jobs

Posted: 11:04 PM, June 29, 2016 Updated: 12:46 AM, June 30, 2016 

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) - Got a college degree? Then it's much more likely that you could land a job in the economic recovery.

Of the 11.6 million jobs created after the Great Recession, 8.4 million went to those with at least a bachelor's degree, according to a new report from the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.

More Education Headlines Study: College education linked to brain tumor risk How the typical American family pays for college Another 3 million went to those with associate's degrees or some college education.

Employers increasingly want workers with at least some college education, be it a degree or even a certificate in a trade, such as nursing assistant or welding, from a technical or community college.

"College level skills determines access to decent jobs now," said Anthony Carnevale, the center's director and lead author of the report. "The modern economy continues to leave Americans without a college education behind."

Some 45% of Americans age 25 to 64 have an associate's degree or higher, while 23% have at least a bachelor's degree. Some 42% of young adults age 18 to 24 are enrolled in higher education.

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The Hidden Perils of Applying to 'Reach' Colleges

Josh Stephens College counselor and specialist in college application essays.

With the arrival of summer, the long-awaited college application process is becoming real for rising seniors. They’re visiting campuses, thinking of essay topics, and, of course, honing their college lists.

For all the smart, personal choices that students will make, cosmetic notions of reputation, rank, and the like will lure many students. Famous ultra-selective colleges that figure prominently in students’, and parents’, daydreams will receive tens of thousands of applications. Many will come from students who are just “taking a shot.”

The combination of social pressures, readily accessible online applications, and faux-egalitarian marketing pitches from colleges makes it easy for thousands of students with no apparent distinctions - other than, of course, being good, smart kids - to pin hopes and dreams on schools with bathymetric admission rates: 12 percent, 9 percent, 4.69 percent.

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Thousands of prisoners to get grants to pay for college behind bars - MarketWatch

By JILLIAN BERMAN REPORTER 
Up to 12,000 incarcerated individuals will have access to government grants to take classes behind bars, starting as early as this summer, the Obama administration announced Friday.

Sixty-seven colleges and universities, including Rutgers, the University of Maine at Augusta and multiple branches of the City University of New York, will be participating in the Second Chance Pell program, according to Department of Education officials. The initiative is a pilot program announced last year to test the outcomes of providing Pell grants — the free money the government provides for low and moderate income students to attend college — to students to pay for classes while incarcerated.

Prisoners must be eligible for release within five years to qualify for the grants.

“We all agree that crime must have consequences, but the men and women who have done their time and paid their debt deserve the opportunity to break with the past,” John King, the Secretary of Education, said on a conference call with reporters.

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